Monday, June 30, 2008

Create Swirl Object

Next, you can create a swirled base for the globe.
Open the Object flyout, and click the Polygon tool. Opens the object flyout, which contains the Polygon tool, Spiral tool, and Graph Paper tool. Lets you draw polygons, stars, and polygons as stars by dragging the mouse.
  • Click on the Drawing Page, and drag to draw a polygon.
  • In the Number Of Points On Polygon box on the Property Bar, type 6.
  • If the polygon looks like a star, enable the Polygon/Star button on the Property Bar. Lets you specify whether the shape is a polygon or a star.
  • In the Object(s) Size Width box on the Property Bar, type 2.
  • In the Object(s) Size Height box, type 4.

Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool. Opens the Interactive Fill flyout, which contains the Interactive Fill tool and the Interactive Mesh Fill tool. Lets you apply fills using the mouse. The direction and position of the fills are controlled using fill arrows, which can be dragged across the surface of the selected object.

  • Click the polygon once to select it.
  • Click at the top point of the polygon and drag straight down, releasing the mouse button at the bottom point of the polygon. Click here to see how to use the Interactive Fill tool.
  • From the on-screen Color Palette, drag a dark blue color onto one of the square fill handles, then drag a light blue color onto the other square fill handle. Click here to see how to change the gradient fill colors.
  • Open the Outline tool flyout, and click No Outline.
  • Opens the Outline flyout, which lets you customize outline attributes such as color, width, style, nib shape, and arrowheads. Lets you remove the outline from the selected object.

Next Cut Filled Polygon

Customize Fill Color to Object

Next, you can apply a customized fill color to the oceans object.
  • Click the Pick tool.
  • Click the object texture-filled ocean to select it.
  • Click Edit menu, Copy.
  • Click Edit menu, Paste.
  • Open the Interactive Fill fly-out, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
  • Opens the Interactive Fill fly-out, which contains the Interactive Fill tool and the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
    Lets you apply fills using the mouse. The direction and position of the fills are controlled using fill arrows, which can be dragged across the surface of the selected object.
  • From the Fill Type list box on the Property Bar, choose Uniform Fill.
  • From the Uniform Fill type list box, choose CMYK.
  • In the C box, type 100.
  • In the M box, type 0.
  • In the Y box, type 0.
  • In the K box, type 0.

Create Transparent Water

Now, you can add a uniform transparency to the water using the Interactive Transparency tool. The transparency is applied on top of any other attributes, such as texture, that are applied to the object.

  • Click here to preview how the globe will look after you follow these steps.
  • Click the Pick tool.
  • Click the uniform blue water object.
  • Click the Interactive Transparency tool.
    Lets you apply uniform, fountain, texture, and transparencies to objects.
    From the Transparency Type list box on the Property Bar, choose Uniform.
  • Click the Pick tool.
  • Drag the continents object over the water object so that the objects overlap completely.
  • Click Arrange menu, Order, To Front.
  • Click the Pick tool.
  • Marquee-select all of the globe objects.
  • On the Property Bar, click the Group button.

Next Create Swirl Object

Thursday, June 19, 2008

Extrude Text

You can extrude the text "Carpe Diem" using the Interactive Extrude tool.
  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Click the text "Carpe Diem" to select it.
  3. Open the Interactive Tools fly out, and click the Interactive Extrude tool. Opens the Interactive Tool fly out, which contains the Blend tool, Distortion tool, Envelope tool, Extrude tool, Drop Shadow tool, and Contour tool. Lets you extrude objects by dragging over them.
  4. On the Property Bar, click the Vector Extrusion Mode button. Lets you create object extrusions made of vectors.
  5. On the Drawing Page, click the text, and drag the vanishing point marker down to set the depth and direction of the extrusion. Drag the slider (white bar) toward the object's center anchor to decrease the extrusion depth. Drag the slider toward the vanishing point (black X) to increase the extrusion depth.

Refine Parameter Extrusion Now, you can refine the parameters of the extrusion.

  1. Click the Extrusion Type picker on the Property Bar, and click Big Front. Lets you choose an extrusion type. Lets you define an extrusion in which the front of the object is larger than the back.
  2. In the Depth box type 3.
  3. In the X Vanishing Point Coordinate box, type .032.
  4. In the Y Vanishing Point Coordinate box, type 1.939.
  5. From the Vanishing Point Properties list box, choose VP Locked To Object.
  6. Click the VP Object/VP Page button. Lets you position the vanishing point, relative to the center of the selected extruded object.
  7. Click the Color button, and enable the Drape Fills check box. Lets you set color properties for the extruded surfaces of the selected object.
  8. Close the dialog.

Lighting Extrusion You can also refine the lighting of the extrusion.

  1. On the Property Bar, click the Lighting button. Lets you set lighting properties for the extruded surfaces of the selected object.
  2. Click the Light #1 button. Adds a light source, which is projected toward the selected extruded object.
  3. In the Intensity box, type 30.
  4. Drag the numbered circle in the Preview box to position the light.
  5. Click the Light #2 button. Adds a second light source, which is projected toward the selected extruded object.
  6. In the Intensity box, type 100.
  7. Close the dialog. Copy Globe.cdr You can open the file globe.cdr and manipulate its objects.

The globe has two objects, the continents and the oceans. The globe will be copied to the brochure after you modify it.

  1. Click File menu, Open.
  2. From the Files Of Type list box, choose CDR - CorelDRAW
  3. From the Look In list box, navigate to the Program Files/ Corel/ Graphics10/ Tutors/ Draw/ Html_docs/ htmlpics directory.
  4. Choose globe.cdr, and click Open.
  5. Click the Pick tool.
  6. Click the globe.
  7. On the Property Bar, click the Ungroup button.
  8. Click a blank area of the Drawing Page to deselect all objects.

Extrude the Ocean First, you can add texture to the oceans object.

  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Click the yellow continents to select them.
  3. Drag the continents object to another position in the Drawing Window.
  4. Click the blue water object.
  5. Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog. Lets you apply uniform, fountain, texture, and pattern fills to objects. Lets you apply texture fills to objects.
  6. From the Texture Library list box, choose Samples 5.
  7. From the Texture list, choose Gray Valley.
  8. Open the Lower Shade color picker, and click the yellow color swatch.
  9. Note: if a texture color shade warning appears, click OK.
    In the Eastern light box, type 41.
  10. In the Northern light box, type 1.
  11. Click OK.

Create Special Effect

In this lesson, you learn how to apply fills and special effects.
This lesson teaches you how to:

  • apply fills
  • adjust colors
  • extrude text
  • distort objects
  • blend objects
  • add perspective to objects
  • apply an envelope to shape objects
  • add drop shadows

Fill Color to Text
If you are starting with this lesson, open the lesson4.cdr sample file in the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory; otherwise, continue working with the file you created in Lesson three.


You can apply a fountain fill to your text.

  • Click the Pick tool.
  • Click the text "Carpe Diem".
  • Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
    Opens the Interactive Fill flyout, which contains the Interactive Fill tool and the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
    Lets you apply fills using the mouse. The direction and position of the fills are controlled using fill arrows, which can be dragged across the surface of the selected object.
  • From the Fill Type list box on the Property Bar, choose Square.

Customize Color


Now, you can customize the colors of your fountain fill.

  • Click the First Fill Picker on the Property Bar, and click the Other button.
    Lets you choose the start color of your fountain fill.
  • From the Model list box, choose CMYK.
  • In the C box, type 100.
  • In the M box, type 20.
  • In the Y box, type 0.
  • In the K box, type 0.
  • Click OK.
  • Click the Last Fill Picker on the Property Bar, and click the Other button.
  • Lets you choose the end color of your fountain fill.
  • From the Model list box, choose CMYK.
  • In the C box, type 2.
  • In the M box, type 30.
  • In the Y box, type 93.
  • In the K box, type 0.
  • Click OK.

Next: Extrude Text

Add Lorem To Brochures

Add Word Lorem to Brochures

Next, you can add the word "Lorem" to the brochure and fit the text to a path with the Freehand tool.

Click here to preview how the text should look.
  1. Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool.
    Opens the Curve flyout, which contains the Freehand tool, Bezier tool, Natural Pen tool, Dimension tool, and Connector Line tool.

    Lets you draw freehand lines and shapes by dragging the mouse, similar to the way you move a pencil on paper.
  2. On the on-screen Color Palette, right-click the orange color swatch.

    Lets you choose a fill color from the on-screen Color Palette, or an outline color by right-clicking a color.
  3. In the Outline Color dialog box, enable the Graphic and the Artistic Text check boxes, and click OK.
  4. At the top of your drawing, click in the black area just below the orange spiral, and drag to draw a curve that mirrors the curve in the drawing. Release the mouse button when you reach the second spiral to the path.
  5. Click the Text tool.
  6. Position the cursor on the start point of the curve.
  7. When the cursor changes to the insertion cursor, click to start the text.
  8. In the Font Size list box on the Property Bar, type 24.
  9. From the Font list box on the Property Bar, choose Arial.
  10. Type the word "Lorem" a few times until you have filled the path line.
  11. Click the Pick tool.
  12. Click the path.
  13. From the Outline Style Selector on the Property Bar, choose X.

Opens a flyout, from which you can choose from a variety of line styles.
Safe Text.


You can save the file to safeguard your drawing.

  1. Click File menu, Save As.
  2. From the Save In list box, choose the location where you want to save the file.
  3. Double-click the directory in which you want to save the file.
  4. In the File Name box, type a filename.
  5. Click Save.


Next: Create Special Effect.

Work With Text

In this lesson, you learn how to work with text.
This lesson teaches you how to add Artistic text to your drawing use the Freehand tool fit text to a defined path Artistic and Paragraph Text
If you are starting with this lesson, open the lesson3.cdr sample file in the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory; otherwise, continue working with the file you created in Lesson two.

You can add Artistic and Paragraph text to your drawings. In this lesson, you work with Artistic text.

1. Click the Text tool.
Lets you enter words directly on the screen as Artistic text, or in frames as Paragraph text.
2. Click the top left of the Drawing Page.
3. In the Font Size list box on the Property Bar, type 44.
4. From the Font list box on the Property Bar, choose Times New Roman.
5. Type "Carpe Diem".
6. Click the Pick tool.
Lets you select, move, and resize objects using the mouse.
7. Drag the text to position it at the top of the Drawing Page.

Add Compass
You can add the letter "N" to define north on the compass.
1. Click the Text tool.
2. Click in the bottom left corner of the Drawing Page, above the compass.
3. In the Font Size list box on the Property Bar, type 32.
4. From the Font list box on the Property Bar, choose Times New Roman.
5. Type the letter "N".
6. Click the Pick tool.
7. Drag the letter above the vertical point on the compass.
8. Marquee-select both the compass and the letter "N", and choose Arrange, Group

Next: Add Lorem to Brochures

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Drawing Mirror-Rotate

1. Mirror and Rotate

You can mirror and rotate the white book, so that it matches the red book. Then you can copy the books into the brochure.

  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Marquee-select the white book. Select objects (or nodes) using the Pick tool or the Shape tool by clicking outside the objects (or nodes) and dragging diagonally to enclose them in a dotted rectangle, called the marquee box.
  3. On the Property Bar, click the Horizontal Mirror button. Lets you mirror an object left to right and vice-versa.
  4. Click the white book so that the rotation and skewing handles appear.
  5. Eight black squares appear at the corners and sides of an object when you select the object. By dragging individual handles, you can transform an object. The shape of the selection handles change when you scale, resize, or mirror an object. Drag the rotation handles until the white book opens in the same direction as the red book.

  6. Drag the white book next to the red book.
  7. Marquee-select the books, and click the Group button on the Property Bar.
  8. Click Edit menu, Copy.
  9. Click Window menu, and choose the window that contains the brochure.
  10. Click Edit menu, Paste.
  11. Drag the books to adjust their position in the brochure.

2. Create Symetrical Spiral

You can use the Spiral tool to create a symmetrical spiral that resembles stylized waves.
  1. Open the Object Flyout, and click the Spiral tool.
  2. In the Spiral Revolutions box on the Property Bar, type 4.
  3. On the Property Bar, click the Symmetrical Spiral button.
  4. Position the cursor at the top right of the drawing, on the black background.
  5. Drag diagonally to draw the spiral.

2. 1 Customize Symmertrical Spiral

You can increase the width and change the color of the outline of the spiral.

  1. Open the Outline tool flyout, and click the Outline Pen Dialog. Opens the Outline flyout, which lets you customize outline attributes such as color, width, style, nib shape, and arrowheads.
  2. In the Width box, type 2. Lets you customize outline attributes such as width, style, and line-ending shapes.
  3. From the Units list box, choose Points.
  4. Click the Color Picker, and click the Other button. Use to select from a range of colors. Click a color picker to display a series of color swatches, then click the color you want.
  5. From the Model list box, choose CMYK. A color mode made up of cyan (C), magenta (M), yellow (Y), and black (K).
  6. In the C box, type 3.
  7. In the M box, type 52.
  8. In the Y box, type 89.
  9. In the K box, type 0.
  10. Click OK.
  11. In the Outline Pen dialog box, click OK.

2.2 Change Spiral Size
Now, you can change the size of the spiral and place a duplicate of it at the bottom of the brochure.

Click here to preview where the spirals should be placed.

  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Click the spiral object to select it.
  3. In the top Object(s) Size box on the Property Bar, type 0.621.
  4. In the bottom Object(s) Size box on the Property Bar, type 0.53, and press ENTER.

2.3. Skew the Spirals

You can use the Free Skew tool to skew the spirals.

  1. Open the Shape Edit fly out, and click the Free Transform tool. Opens the Shape Edit fly out, which contains the Shape tool, Knife tool, Eraser tool, and Free Transform tool. Opens the Shape Edit fly out, which contains the Shape tool, Knife tool, Eraser tool, and Free Transform tool.
    Lets you select the last used Free Transform tool, i.e., the Free Rotation tool, Free Angle Reflection tool, Free Scale tool, or the Free Skew tool
  2. On the Property Bar, click the Free Skew tool. Lets you slant the horizontal and vertical lines of an object simultaneously, relative to the object's anchor point. You can set the anchor point by clicking anywhere in the Drawing Window with the Free Skew tool.
  3. Click one of the spirals to select it, and drag to skew it.
  4. Click Edit menu, Duplicate.
  5. Drag the new spiral to the bottom right corner of the drawing.

2.4 Safeguard Drawing

You can save the file to safeguard your drawing.

  1. Click File menu, Save As.
  2. From the Save In list box, choose the location where you want to save the file.
  3. Double-click the directory in which you want to save the file.
  4. In the File Name box, type a filename.
  5. Click Save.

Next Work With Text

Sample of Drawing

1. Sampe of Drawing

If you are starting with this lesson, open the lesson2.cdr sample file in the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory; otherwise, continue working with the file you created in Lesson one. You can import files with graphics, and incorporate objects into a drawing.

  1. Click File menu, Import.
  2. From the Files Of Type list box, choose CDR - CorelDRAW.
  3. From the Look In list box, navigate to the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/htmlpics directory.
  4. Choose map.cdr, and click the Import button.
  5. Position the Import Placement Start Cursor in the upper left corner of the Drawing Page, and click to place the graphic.

2. Setup Gridlines

Use to size and position the top left corner of an image at an exact location in the drawing. Place the cursor anywhere in the Drawing Window to help you align and position objects.

The Drawing Page is the portion of the Drawing Window that appears on the printed page. This area is enclosed by a rectangle with a shadow effect.

You can place guidelines on the page borders so that you can place the map outline precisely in the upper left corner.

  1. Click View menu, Guidelines Setup.
  2. In the list of categories, click Presets.
  3. Enable the Page Borders check box.
  4. Click the Apply Presets button.
  5. Click OK.
  6. On the Property Bar, click the Snap To Guidelines button.
  7. Click the Pick tool.
  8. Select the object map outline, and drag it into the top left corner of the Drawing Page until it snaps to the guidelines.

2.1 Snap to Gridline

Enables and disables the Snap To Guidelines command, which automatically aligns objects with any guidelines you encounter as you drag the objects.

Lets you select, move, and resize objects using the mouse.


Next, you can import the graphic MAP.JPG.

  1. Click File menu, Import.
  2. From the Files Of Type list box, choose JPG - JPEG Bitmap.
  3. From the Look In list box, navigate to the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory.
  4. Choose map.jpg, and click the Import button.
  5. Position the Import Placement Start cursor in the middle of the Drawing Page, and click once to place the graphic.

Note: better results may be achieved by first converting this file to TIF format.

3. Combine Map Outline and Background

You can use the PowerClip feature to combine the map outline and the map background.

  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Select the map background (map.tif or map.jpg).
  3. Click Effects menu, PowerClip, Place Inside Container.
  4. Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the map outline (map.cdr).
4. View Brochures

You can remove the guidelines to make it easier to view the brochure.

  1. Click View menu, Guidelines Setup.
  2. In the list of categories, click Presets.
  3. Disable the Page Borders check box.
  4. Click OK.

4.1.Position the Brochures

You can import and position a compass in the lower left corner of the brochure.

  1. Click File menu, Import.
  2. From the Files Of Type list box, choose CDR - CorelDRAW.
  3. From the Look In list box, navigate to the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory.
  4. Choose north pointer.cdr and click the Import button.
  5. Position the Import Placement Start cursor in the lower left corner of the Drawing Page, and click once to place the graphic.
  6. Click the Pick tool.
  7. Drag the compass to adjust its position.

4.2 Copy Image to Brochures

You can open the books.cdr file and use the elements to create the image of two books. The books will be copied to the brochure after you modify them.

  1. Click File menu, Open.
  2. From the Files Of Type list box, choose CDR - CorelDRAW.
  3. From the Look In list box, navigate to the Program Files/Corel/Graphics10/Tutors/Draw/Html_docs/htmlpics directory.
  4. Choose books.cdr and click Open.
  5. Open the Zoom tool flyout, and click the Zoom tool.
  6. Click the blue book to zoom in.
  7. Click the Pick tool.
  8. Marquee-select the blue book. Click here to see how to make a marquee selection.
  9. On the Property Bar, click the Ungroup button.
  10. Click a blank area of the Drawing Page to deselect all objects.
  11. Click the blue background of the blue book.
  12. On the on-screen Color Palette, click the red color swatch.
  13. Drag the cursor to marquee-select the entire red book.
  14. On the Property Bar, click the Group button.

5. Change the Background

Next, you can change the background and outline colors of the yellow book.

  1. Click the Pick tool.
  2. Marquee-select the yellow book.
  3. On the Property Bar, click the ungroup button.
  4. Click a blank area of the Drawing Page to deselect all objects.
  5. Click the yellow background of the yellow book.
  6. On the on-screen Color Palette, click the white color swatch.
  7. Click a blank area of the Drawing Page to deselect all objects.
  8. Click the brown outline.
  9. On the on-screen Color Palette, click the black color swatch.
  10. Marquee-select the entire white book.
  11. On the Property Bar, click the Group button.

Next: Using Mirror and Rotate

Corel Tutorial

Tutorial:

1. Introduction of CorelDRAW Tutorial

This tutor covers the tools and steps for creating a one-page brochure. The lessons teach you how to work with bitmaps, text, fills, and special effects, as well as publish your work to the Internet.

We recommend that you complete the lessons in the order they are presented; however, you can skip a lesson or return to the main menu to begin a different lesson at any time.

Go to Lesson One. In this lesson, you learn how to specify the layout and settings of the document, so that you can create graphics for the brochure.

This lesson teaches you how to

  • set the page size
  • apply a background color
  • save your work

2. Create New Corel File

If the CorelDRAW Application Window is empty, click File, New to start a new drawing.

You can customize your page layout and setup by changing the attributes in the Options dialog box.

  • Click Layout menu, Page Setup.
  • In the Options dialog box, enable the Portrait button.
  • In the Width box, type 6.0.
  • In the Height box, type 9.0.
  • Click the Save Custom Page button.
  • In the Save Custom Page Type As box, type a name for the custom page.
  • Click OK.
  • In the Options dialog box, click OK.

3. Create Background Page

You can add a background color to the page.

  • Click Tools menu, Options.
  • In the list of categories, double-click Document, Page, and click Background.
  • Enable the Solid button.
  • Click the Color Picker, and click the Other button.
  • From the Model list box, choose CMYK.
  • In the C box, type 0.
  • In the M box, type 0.
  • In the Y box, type 0.
  • In the K box, type 90.
  • Click OK.
  • In the Options dialog box, click OK.

4. Save File

You can save the file to safeguard your drawing.

  • Click File menu, Save As.
  • From the Save In list box, choose the location where you want to save the file.
  • Double-click the directory in which you want to save the file.
  • In the File Name box, type a filename.
  • Click Save.

5. Import File and Object

In this lesson, you learn how to import files and objects, create shapes, manipulate objects, and use the Spiral and Free Skew tools.

This lesson teaches you how to

  • import files
  • use guidelines
  • add objects
  • change colors
  • rotate and mirror objects
  • draw simple objects
  • use the Spiral tool
  • use the Free Skew tool

Next: Sample of Drawing

Friday, June 13, 2008

File Compression

Monitoring, Managing, and Troubleshooting Access to Files and Folders

Even in this age of huge hard drives, there are often times when it would be convenient to compress some data. Whether you are zipping data with a software package you've purchased or running a file system based compression scheme, the idea is to maximize the amount of hard drive space you have available for other data. The first recommendation is to delete any unnecessary files on your drive (temp files, Internet cache, etc.), then make backups of your data that can be removed. If you have 100MB of scanned images, try to put them on a CD-ROM or zip disk to free up room. You may surprise yourself and free up so much room that you no longer require compression. However, in many cases you will still need to compress your data.

The good news is that Windows 2000 Professional supports file-level compression. You'll need to be running the NTFS file system, but other than that, compression is easy to set up.

The compression algorithm used in NTFS compression is very robust. It reduces the size of a text-based file by around 50 percent, and executables by around 40 percent. It is possible to realize a 40–50 percent gain in the effective size of your volume or drive when it is compressed.
Enabling File Compression

Compression is activated or disabled in two ways, either by using a GUI (My Computer or Windows Explorer) or with a command-line utility, compact.exe. To enable file compression using the graphical interface, perform the following steps:



  • From within My Computer or Windows Explorer, right-click a folder or file to be compressed.
  • From the context menu, select Properties.
  • A property sheet with several tabs will now appear. From the General Tab, Attributes, select the Advanced Attributes tab.
  • The Advanced Attributes tab has two sections, Archive and Index attributes in the top section, and Compress or Encrypt attributes in the bottom half. This last one is the one we're interested in Figure below.









  • Enabling or disabling compression is simple. Select the check box for compression to enable compression for this file, and clear it to disable compression.

  • After checking or unchecking the Compress contents to save disk space box, click Apply for the compression or decompression to take effect.

  • After either enabling or disabling compression, and depending upon the amount of data you've just compressed/decompressed, you'll notice that once you click Apply, your PC may become less responsive to foreground applications. This is normal; your machine has a lot of data to run its compression algorithm against. This selection is available for individual files, folders, and even entire drives, as long as they reside on NTFS partitions.

  • The below figure shows the Properties sheet for the Excel document again after compression. Notice the size on disk: 53K versus the original 129 K. This file was reduced to 40 percent of its original size.


Wednesday, June 4, 2008

Implementing, Managing, and Troubleshooting Mobile Computer Hardware

As more organizations discover the productivity enhancements that a community of mobile users can realize, these organizations will need to support more laptops. Traditionally only a necessity for sales personnel or on-the-go executives, laptops weren't a fit for most users.

However, as laptops became faster, more powerful, and as inexpensive as desktop computers, they became more widely used. Laptops still have their own unique support requirements, however, and an organization wishing to provide laptops for their users should ensure that support staff is aware of these unique support needs.

Due to the size of the laptop hardware, it is impossible to use existing bus technologies interchangeably with desktop machines. While laptops will still be able to use the latest computer technology (fastest networks, latest SCSI and modem technology), that technology needs to be (and is) adapted to buses that laptops use.

For example, an average desktop machine will probably have the hard drive and CD-ROM drive connected via an Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) or Enhanced IDE (EIDE) controller. Normally, IDE controllers can have two drives per channel, and in order to add a second drive, there must be an open drive bay and a cable to connect the second drive to the controller. If you wanted to make use of faster SCSI drives, you would have to install a SCSI controller in a PCI or ISA slot.

This kind of flexibility is not present in laptop systems. While there may be vendor-specific implementations of ISA, PCI, and IDE technology in a given laptop model, expandability is still an issue. Laptops are designed to be small and portable. Laptop size would be increased by necessity if there were space allocated for standard full-sized PCI slots and a second IDE hard drive. The only way for laptop vendors to provide the same level of expandability and choice of hardware is to support a bus technology designed for mobile hardware.

This is where the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) bus comes into play. The PCMCIA bus was designed for laptop use. PCMCIA devices allow for technology available in desktop hardware to be used on laptops. Organizations can use the same Ethernet technology on all computers, whether it is through a PCI network card on a desktop or a PCMCIA network card on a laptop.

Configuring Power Management

Power Management is a set of configuration options that enable your Windows 2000 Professional computer to manage how and when your computer consumes power. Normally, a computer will be plugged into a constant AC power source, but there are many situations for both desktops and laptops where users will want to manage their power consumption. Power management is configured using the Power Options applet in Control Panel.

Power Management support under Windows 2000 Professional is divided into two separate power management initiatives supported by the PC industry: Advanced Power Management (APM ), and Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI).

Advanced Power Management (APM)
APM is a legacy power management scheme that is supported by older BIOSes and Windows 95. The design goal of APM was to allow the hardware to be shut down or disabled after a period of inactivity and reenabled if actively needed by the user. The detection of inactivity was in most cases incomplete or nonintuitive under APM. For example, if a user were trying to download a large file over the computer's modem, the APM components under the operating system would detect that neither the mouse nor keyboard was being used. It would then shut down the monitor, spin down the disks, or place the entire computer in a low power consumption mode known as